• recreation

    Wine Making Tips From McLaren Vale Winery Expert Denis Mackenzie

    How to Make Wine from Home – Wine Making Tips From McLaren Vale Winery Expert Denis Mackenzie

     

    For anyone that’s interested in wine making, the chances are that you’ll be keen to replicate the techniques and methods utilised by market leaders such as Fox Creek Wines; without having to spend thousands in the process. Fortunately, DIY wine production is now more possible than ever and for those of you that are keen to create your own unique vintage, or prepare an exclusive type for your own enjoyment; here’s a closer look at how to produce this type of alcohol from home.

    Get your wine making ingredients together

    The first thing that you’ll need to do is to get your ingredients in one place, ready to begin the fermentation process. Grapes are commonly used, but it’s also possible to turn to apples and other types of fruit if you’d prefer. In this instance we will consider grapes as the main source of flavour for the wine, so the next thing to do will be to properly clean them.

    Years ago, grapes were often pressed by foot, but due to the unhygienic nature of this activity, it may be a good idea to invest in a small hand held presser, or another suitable piece of machinery instead.

    Choosing the right tools for making wine at home

    The process of fermentation is very important to ensure that the wine is as flavourful as it is appealing. The skin of a grape will need to be pressed along with the internal composition of the fruit to form a thick pulp. During this stage, a reaction will occur that isn’t harmful to human skin, but can certainly stain furniture and other items around the home.

    Buying a large wooden bowl can be a good choice and when paired with a device to crush the grapes into their constituent parts; you’ll already be on your way to producing your own alcohol. Once crushed, the bowl, barrel, or container will need to be sealed for around 14 days to allow the fermentation to fully take place. Some experts will advise you to add water and certain preservatives, but this isn’t really necessary, as the acidic properties within the grapes can allow them to remain free from decomposition for at least a couple of weeks.

    Once fermentation is over, you will need to sieve away the unwanted pulp to retrieve the liquid that has been created as a result of the reaction. At this point, water and flavourings can be added to enhance the flavour, or to add to the volume of the liquid. This formula should then be stored for anywhere between a few weeks and several months (or years) to allow the composition to absorb its surroundings, as well as improve the flavour and reduce any bitterness that may be left behind from the fermentation period.

    Author Denis Mackenzie

  • beauty,  recreation

    Dermabrasion Versus Microdermabrasion – which is the best for smooth soft skin.

    Dermabrasion Versus Microdermabrasion

    When it comes to smooth, soft skin there are two particular treatments that are at the forefront of many salon services. They are called dermabrasion and microdermabrasion; two therapies that are similar in name, but very different by nature. On one side of the coin you have a solution that is effective when providing smooth, younger looking skin. On the other, you have an option that can strip dead and dying cells to reveal a much fresher complexion.

    Understanding Dermabrasion

    This type of treatment is one of the most common found within cosmetic clinics; particularly those that specialise in skin care. Derma means skin, hence the term dermal layers being used for the individual sheets of skin that can be found throughout the human body. It’s these layers that are responsible for producing skin cells and as new cells are formed, the older ones are forced upwards.

    Over time these cells can begin to build up, often weighing down the skin; which can lead to sagging, wrinkling and age lines in general. Dermabrasion works to ‘plane’ the surface of the skin, which acts to shave the upper most dermal layer in a unique way. Rather than using a razor blade to remove hair – dermabrasion therapies are ideal for targeting the dead and dying cells, allowing them to separate from other living cells to reveal a much smoother complexion underneath.

    Getting to Grips with Microdermabrasion

    Where the previously mentioned treatment is ideal for removing dead skin cells from the face, microdermabrasion differs in the way that it functions; even if it offers quite similar results. Instead of planing the surface of skin, this technique relies on thousands of tiny microcrystals which are blasted onto the surface of the outermost dermal layer, lifting away dirt, impurities and dead skin cells.

    The treatment is entirely safe and doesn’t use any harmful chemicals whatsoever. Although the thought of having air and microcrystals blasted against the skin might be a daunting prospect, the truth is that it is painless – and as the crystals are organic, there are no health concerns associated, nor any side effects beyond slight tingling to mark the passage of blood flow.

    Both of these treatments can be a very effective way to reveal a clean, fresh and younger looking complexion to the skin – and because of their gentle nature, they can be enjoyed as often as once or twice a month. For maximum results, always consult a trained therapist and consider pairing this service with a filler to minimise the look of wrinkles, whilst maximising the health and functionality of your dermal layers.

    Dermabrasion available in Australia